Questions and sample answers on hebicides and weed control

What are the benefits and disadvantages of the frequency of use of different herbicide groups

The use of different herbicide groups may results to benefits or losses in agriculture, particularly if the frequency of application of the chemicals is not well monitored. Undoubtedly, if proper levels are used under the precepts of integrated weed management (IWM), the crop yields increase corresponding. However, unbalance applications and unregulated application of herbicides my cause detrimental impacts on the overall crop production. The frequency of applying the herbicide is an essential aspect of weed management and control. However, different weeds may demand the application of different groups of herbicides. Empirically, all herbicide groups are chemical in nature and are used to kill or manage weeds that compete with the crops for…

Identify the key herbicide groups

The mode of herbicidal action makes the herbicides be categorized into different groups that are initialized by alphabetical numbers. First group A and B show the highest risk and frequency of developing resistance. The group A and B should be frequently applied only during the post-emergent period to control monocot and broadleaf weeds so as to enhance proper weed control and management. Group A is of particular importance when controlling the grasses while B controls the broadleaf weeds. Unfortunately, the two groups have the highest chance of causing weed resistance, as the weeds take the…

Give the benefits and disadvantages of the use of different herbicides each year and rotation

Each year or rotation, herbicides are applied and exposed to crops or plants as Pre-Plant Soil Incorporated, pre-emergence, or post-emergence. Pre-Plant Soil Incorporated herbicides are applied before sowing of crops. For example, EPTC and Trifluralin are incorporated into the soil to avoid breakdown due to sunlight or vaporization. Such herbicides are not easily lost due to windy or wet weather; hence, essential for early weed control. However, they stay long in the soil, which may make the weeds develop a resistance; thus, minimal positive impacts. Such herbicides do not…

What is the risk associated with herbicide resistance developing for the chemical group used?

In most cases, weeds contain some unique individuals that resist all the herbicide groups; however, such weeds have a low-level presence. Evidently, continued and frequent exposure to any herbicide group and surges of resistant plants may lead to building up of a population that is resistant. The natural occurrence of resistance of the weed is not linked to the application techniques or weather conditions but shows inherent features or genetic constitutions of the resistant weeds. Fortunately, such resistant weeds are less frequent and normally undetected. However, continual use of the same weed killers may exacerbate resistance. Furthermore, removal of the susceptible weeds may give more opportunity and a chance for the resistant weeds to…

Identify the IWM tactic groups and good agronomic practices currently used to manage the weed

Integrated weed management requires a systematic and comprehensive approach to weed control. IWM applies both the traditional and contemporary methodology of weed control. There are about five groups of tactics used in the IWM. Group 1 entails deletion of the weed seed from the target soil. Such mechanism involves burning residues, encouraging insect seed predation, inversion ploughing, delayed sowing, and autumn tickle. Tactic group 2 involves killing the seedlings or weeds in the area of target. Weeds and their seedlings can be killed using pre-sowing and fallow cultivation or the use of herbicides. Other tactics of…

Describe renovation of crops and pastures as IWM strategy of weed management

Through the practices of green and brown manuring, hay freezing, and mulching, the farmer will benefit immensely through the biological weed control. The renovated crops and pastures are then turned into the soil to improve the soil fertility and organic matter and at the same time reduce weed burdens (Dobariya, Mathukia, & Mathukia, 2013). The methodology is simple and cost-effective as the crops, and other plants are buried, used to make mulch, or undergo chemical desiccation (McGillion, Storrie, & CRC, 2006). Notably, the practice also reduces the viable seed-set; hence manage the herbicide resistant weeds. In sum, proper implementation of the…

Describe Autumn tickle or autumn scratch as IWM strategy of weed management

The practice entails shallow cultivation that fosters germination of weed seed at shallow depths of not more than 3 cm. The weed has favourable germination condition, but ultimately dies out due to depletion of the seed reserves (McGillion, Storrie, & CRC, 2006). Weeds that germinate after the autumn tickle are very easy to control. Notably, the efficacy of the practice depends on the weed type, environmental conditions, and also can be incorporated into other strategies. The precepts of preferring this method are because it can be used simultaneously with others so as to…

Describe weed seed collection during harvesting as IWM strategy of weed management

Undoubtedly, harvesting provides the best opportunity to pick or remove the seeds of weeds and prevent spreading in the farm. Objectively, it aims at reducing seed populations with a particular focus on the weeds that are resistant to herbicides. Ideally, it is essential when managing the annual weeds to minimize the…

Identify ways of improving weed control and why they are likely to be effective

According to my philosophical discourse, effective weed control means shifting from the concept of weed control to adopting weed management. Even on a practical basis, weed control is not synonymous to weed management (Pawar, 2014). The former aims at achieving immediate goals of eliminating the population of weeds by the conventional application of tillage and herbicides. Conversely, weed management extends such practicality and aims at reducing the emergence and invasion of weeds, prevention of weed reproduction, and reduce or minimize competition between weed and crops (Upadhyaya & Blackshaw, 2007). Implicitly, weed control is an aftermath practice while the management fosters adoption of…

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